Resources during COVID-19

The following collection of resources address challenges and provide possible methods for supporting children and families during the ongoing pandemic. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the virus strain that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a respiratory illness.

Self Care Strategies

Taking Care of Yourself — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Offers providers a list of self-care strategies that they can use to help determine how they feel, restore balance, and build connections after a difficult event.

Self-Care in the Time of Coronavirus — Child Mind Institute
For parents, prioritizing your own well-being benefits your whole family.

How to Avoid Passing Anxiety on to Your Kids — Child Mind Institute
Help yourself, and them, by learning techniques to manage stress in a healthy way.

 

Resilience Tools

Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) Online — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Aims to help survivors gain skills to manage distress and cope with post-disaster stress and adversity. This course utilizes skills-building components from mental health treatment that have been found helpful in a variety of post-trauma situations. Research suggests that a skills-building approach is more effective than supportive counseling. SPR is appropriate for developmental levels across the lifespan, and is culturally informed.

Family Resilience and Traumatic Stress: A Guide for Mental Health Providers — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Provides information on family resilience. This fact sheet discusses a family's ability to maintain or resume effective functioning, including care of its members during crises and following potentially traumatic events.

How to Help Children Manage Fears — Child Mind Institute
Tips for teaching children how to build resilience and learn to calm themselves down, even when things feel scary.

How Mindfulness Can Help During COVID-19 — Child Mind Institute
Tips for calming anxiety during a difficult time.

Stress, Resilience, and the Role of Science: Responding to the Coronavirus Pandemic — Center on the Developing Child
This statement from Center Director Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., discusses two lessons we’ve already learned about child development from this pandemic.

How to Help Families and Staff Build Resilience During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Center on the Developing Child
Resilience can help us get through and overcome hardship. But resilience is not something we’re born with—it’s built over time as the experiences we have interact with our unique, individual genetic makeup. This guide discusses to three ways we can affect experiences and the balance of the resilience scale based on the science of child development.

Building Communities of Home: Creating a Better Future for Children and Families in a Time of Crisis — Casey Family Programs
This special report reflects the dramatically transformed landscape for children and families as the country confronts a global pandemic, economic disruption and its history of systemic racism.

For Parents/Caregivers

Parent/Caregiver Guide to Helping Families Cope With the Coronavirus Disease 2019 — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Provides information for parents and caregivers about coping with COVID-19 in your community. Knowing important information about the outbreak and learning how to be prepared can reduce stress and help calm likely anxieties. This resource will help parents and caregivers think about how ​COVID-19 might affect their family—both physically and emotionally—and what they can do to help their family cope.

Helping Children with Traumatic Separation or Traumatic Grief Related to COVID-19 — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
This tip sheet is for caregivers or other adults supporting children with traumatic separation or traumatic grief related to COVID-19. Especially in stressful times, in addition to the suggestions here, all children benefit from caregivers listening to and validating their different feelings.

Supporting Children During Coronavirus (COVID19) — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Offers ways to support children and talk to them about COVID-19. This fact sheet describes how to start a conversation with children about COVID-19, correct inaccurate information, encourage children to ask questions and how to answer them, help children self-regulate, and outlines common reactions, how to stay connected, practice self-care, and what to do if you need extra help.

How to Help Children Manage Fears — Child Mind Institute
Tips for teaching children how to build resilience and learn to calm themselves down, even when things feel scary.

What to Do (and Not Do) When Children Are Anxious — Child Mind Institute
How to respect their feelings without empowering their fears.

How to Avoid Passing Anxiety on to Your Kids — Child Mind Institute
Help yourself, and them, by learning techniques to manage stress in a healthy way.

Talking to Kids About the Coronavirus — Child Mind Institute
Kids worry more when they’re kept in the dark. Here’s what to say.

Supporting Kids Through the COVID-19 Crisis — Child Mind Institute
Tips for nurturing and protecting children at home.

Supporting Teenagers and Young Adults During the Coronavirus Crisis — Child Mind Institute
Tips for parents with older children at home.

Supporting Your LGBTQ Child's Mental Health During COVID-19 — Human Rights Campaign
A tip sheet for parents of transgender and gender expansive children and adolescents on how they can help their children maintain and manage their mental health during COVID-19.

Supporting Your LGBTQ Child's Mental Health During Quarantine — Human Rights Campaign
A video conversation between Ellen Kahn, Human Rights Campaign’s senior director of programs and partnerships, and Dr. Scott Leibowitz, child and adolescent psychiatrist, where they discuss the many ways in which parents, guardians and other family and community members can support transgender and gender-expansive young people and their mental health while at home.

Resources for Families of Children on the Spectrum — Child Mind Institute
From how to talk to kids with autism about the coronavirus to how to teach handwashing and develop schedules.

Giving Kids With ADHD Support and Structure During the Coronavirus Crisis — Child Mind Institute
Managing attention (yours and theirs) will help kids thrive.

Building Communities of Home: Creating a Better Future for Children and Families in a Time of Crisis — Casey Family Programs
This special report reflects the dramatically transformed landscape for children and families as the country confronts a global pandemic, economic disruption and its history of systemic racism.

For Providers

Family Resilience and Traumatic Stress: A Guide for Mental Health Providers — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Provides information on family resilience. This fact sheet discusses a family's ability to maintain or resume effective functioning, including care of its members during crises and following potentially traumatic events.

How to Help Families and Staff Build Resilience During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Center on the Developing Child
Resilience can help us get through and overcome hardship. But resilience is not something we’re born with—it’s built over time as the experiences we have interact with our unique, individual genetic makeup. This guide discusses to three ways we can affect experiences and the balance of the resilience scale based on the science of child development.

What Is COVID-19? And How Does It Relate to Child Development? — Center on the Developing Child
This infographic explains the basics of what COVID-19 is, and what it can mean for stress levels in both children and the adults who care for them. It also offers some easy and concrete solutions to help caregivers ensure that both they and the children they care for don’t experience long-term effects of stress.

Stress, Resilience, and the Role of Science: Responding to the Coronavirus Pandemic — Center on the Developing Child
This statement from Center Director Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., discusses two lessons we’ve already learned about child development from this pandemic.

Advocacy and Child’s Attorney-Client Relationships during COVID-19 — National Association of Counsel for Children
In the uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic, youth in the child welfare system need their attorneys to be communicative, informative, knowledgeable, diligent, zealous, and healthy. Learn more practice tips and guidance about what youth need from their child welfare attorneys in this tip sheet.

Supporting Safety of LGBTQ Children and Youth: Risk Factors of Child Abuse and Neglect During COVID-19 — Human Rights Campaign
This research brief provides information about the risk that LGBTQ children and youth, of which there are at least 2 million in the United States alone, will face amidst COVID-19, as well as resources available to them as they navigate these times.

Building Communities of Home: Creating a Better Future for Children and Families in a Time of Crisis — Casey Family Programs
This special report reflects the dramatically transformed landscape for children and families as the country confronts a global pandemic, economic disruption and its history of systemic racism.

For Children

Simple Activities for Children and Adolescents — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Offers activity ideas to parents whose families are sheltering in place, social distancing, and homeschooling due to school closures amidst the COVID-19 outbreak. This fact sheet outlines activities families can do without supplies, in lighted areas or in dark areas to stay preoccupied when dealing with the stress of a major event.

Trinka and Sam Fighting the Big Virus: Trinka, Sam, and Littletown Work Together — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Helps young children and families talk about their experiences and feelings related to COVID-19 and the need to shelter in place. In the story, the coronavirus has spread to Littletown causing changes in everyone's lives. The story opens doors to conversations about COVID-19, ways that families and communities are working together to keep safe from the virus, family and community strengths, common challenges and reactions in children and adults, ways that families support children and each other, and our intense gratitude for frontline workers. A caregiver guide is available in the back of the book that provides ways parents can use the story with their children.

Fighting the Big Virus: Trinka's and Sam's Questions — The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Provides questions that Trinka and Sam have about the big virus and ways to answer those questions. This companion story includes common questions that children may have about COVID-19. The pages from this companion story can be read as individual pages or you can include the pages into the Trinka and Sam Fighting the Big Virus: Trinka, Sam, and Littletown Work Together book. You can limit which questions to use with your children, as children may have questions about some things regarding the virus and others may not be appropriate for their experience.

For Teens

Supporting Teenagers and Young Adults During the Coronavirus Crisis — Child Mind Institute
Tips for parents with older children at home.

 

 

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